The Margaret B. Stillwell Legacy Society

Organized in 1904 and incorporated in 1927, the Bibliographical Society of America (BSA) is the oldest scholarly society in North America dedicated to the study of books and manuscripts as physical objects. Member gifts have played an important role in advancing BSA’s scholarly mission over the past century. Contributions and legacy gifts from BSA members have provided hundreds of thousands of dollars to promote the study of books and manuscripts as physical objects and have furnished important financial support to early-career bibliographers and scholars.

The Bibliographical Society of America is establishing a Legacy Society named after distinguished bibliographer Margaret Bingham Stillwell (1887-1984).  Our intent in founding the Margaret B. Stillwell Legacy Society is to recognize the long tradition of giving at BSA and to ensure a vibrant future for tomorrow’s bibliographic scholars.

“What you leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments,
but what is woven into the lives of others.”    — Pericles

We are currently seeking Founding Members of the Margaret B. Stillwell Legacy Society who share the BSA’s commitment to bibliography as an ongoing framework for understanding books and other textual artifacts. Your generous gift will assure the long-term stability and financial strength necessary for the Society to continue to promote bibliography and build our scholarly community. Any BSA member who joins before March 31, 2020 will be acknowledged as a Founding Member of this important society.  

We trust that the BSA has enhanced your understanding of the humanities, whether through its prizes and fellowships, publications, sharing at conferences, or the fellowship of other Society members. Joining the Margaret B. Stillwell Legacy Society is a simple way for you to affirm the importance of bibliography, to create a powerful partnership across generations, and to support future scholars.

What is My Commitment in Joining the Legacy Society?

We ask that you remember the Bibliographical Society of America as a component of your legacy plan. It’s that straightforward—no minimum amount, just a simple promise to remember the BSA in your estate plan.

Becoming a member of the Margaret B. Stillwell Legacy Society ensures that your tax-free charitable donation will support programs of particular interest to you or grow our endowment. We would be honored to know of your intentions to include the BSA in your estate plan and to acknowledge those intentions during your lifetime by recognizing you as a member of the Margaret B. Stillwell Legacy Society. With their permission, Legacy Society members will be acknowledged annually in the PBSA journal and on the BSA website. Legacy Society members will also be invited to our annual donor recognition event during Bibliography Week.

 

When Should I Include a BSA Gift in My Estate Plan?

Please consider including BSA in your estate plan any time you are updating beneficiaries for your retirement plans and/or life insurance policies, or drafting or changing your will or estate plan. Your financial or legal advisor can provide professional guidance related to your specific estate, beneficiaries, income goals, taxes, and other considerations.

Once you make BSA aware of your intended bequest by letter or email, we will then include you as a member of the Margaret B. Stillwell Legacy Society. Your membership can be acknowledged in your name, in honor or in memory of another, or can be anonymous.  All gifts are significant and will help us to further our mission.

Won’t you please consider joining your peers in sharing the BSA’s tradition of excellence with generations to come?

Should you have further questions, please contact:

Erin Schreiner, Executive Director
P.O. Box 1537 Lenox Hill Station,
New York, NY 10021
1-212-452-2710
bsa@bibsocamer.org

BSA Tax ID 13-1632509

 


The Bibliographical Society of America does not provide tax or legal advice. This information has been prepared without regard to the individual objectives and financial circumstances of persons who receive it and does not provide individually tailored advice. Tax laws are complex and subject to change. Individuals should consult with their attorney for matters involving estate planning and with their personal tax advisor for matters involving tax planning.