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About BSA Fellowships

In keeping with the central value the Society places on bibliography as a critical framework, the BSA funds a number of fellowships to promote inquiry and research in books and other textual artifacts in both traditional and emerging formats.

Bibliographical projects may range chronologically from the study of clay tablets and papyrus rolls to contemporary literary texts and born-digital materials. Topics relating to books and manuscripts in any field and of any period are eligible for consideration as long as they include analysis of the physical object – that is, the handwritten, printed, or other textual artifact – as historical evidence.

Projects may include establishing a text or studying the history of book or manuscript production, publication, distribution, collecting, or reading, and the history of bibliographical study itself. Fellowship awards may be used to fund travel to collections and other expenses associated with research, publication, or other scholarly outcomes related to the topic for which the award was made. Projects that are primarily enumerative (lists) will be considered for funding provided the proposal states a clear objective, describes the need for such work within its field, and specifies the extent to which textual objects will be described. Sample entries for project results are also welcome, if applicable.

For projects that involve significant computer applications or use of digital surrogates, the proposal must explain how the digital analysis relates to the researcher’s examination and study of original artifacts. Projects that rely wholly on digital surrogates without prior analysis of original materials will not be funded.

Normally, BSA fellowships support research and are not intended to fund time spent writing. Exceptionally, during the 2022 cycle, when Covid-19 restrictions on travel may still be in effect, the Committee will consider proposals for writing projects based on prior bibliographical research.

Projects involving more than one researcher are eligible for consideration if they meet the criteria described above. Detailed instructions for group applications are offered in the application form.

Applicants should read the fellowship titles and descriptions below to assess the general suitability of their projects to BSA’s program. Please note that individuals who have not received BSA fellowships in the previous five years will be given preference.

Click here for information about the application process, including eligibility requirements, and a link to the application form.


 

Fellowship Opportunities

BSA Short-term Fellowships ($3,000) support bibliographical research that focuses on the physical aspects of textual artifacts as historical evidence.  Such artifacts, both tangible and digital, in any field and of any period are eligible for consideration.  Projects may include studying the history of textual production, publication, distribution, collecting, or reading.  Projects to establish a text are also eligible.

The Fredson Bowers Award ($1,500) is funded jointly with the Bibliographical Society of the UK where it is a Major Grant.  Applicants must apply through the Bibliographical Society (UK).

Topical Fellowships

British Book Trades

The Katharine F. Pantzer Senior Fellowship in the British Book Trades ($6,000) supports research by a senior scholar engaged in bibliographical inquiry into the history of the book trades and publishing history in Britain during the hand-press period, as well as studies of authorship, reading, and collecting based on the examination of British books published in that period, with a special emphasis on descriptive bibliography.  This fellowship is intended for senior scholars who have a documented record of research and publication in the field.  Funded by a bequest from Katharine F. Pantzer.  The application form can be found at the BSA’s Kaleidoscope page.

British Book Trades

The Katharine Pantzer Junior Fellowship in the British Book Trades ($3,000) supports bibliographical inquiry into the history of the book trades and publishing history in Britain during the hand-press period, as well as studies of authorship, reading, and collecting based on the examination of British books published in that period, with special emphasis on descriptive bibliography.  This fellowship is intended for early-career scholars.  Funded by a bequest from Katharine F. Pantzer. Apply through the BSA.

Cartography

The Charles J. Tannenbaum Fellowship in Cartographical Bibliography ($3,000) supports projects dealing with all aspects of the history, presentation, printing, design, distribution, and reception of cartographical documents from Renaissance times to the present, with a special emphasis on eighteenth-century cartography.  Funded by the Pine Tree Foundation of New York. Apply through the BSA.

Culinary Arts

The BSA-Pine Tree Foundation Fellowship in Culinary Bibliography ($3,000) supports the bibliographical study of printed and manuscript cookbooks (once commonly known as receipt books); medical recipe books that also contain culinary recipes; other types of books, manuscript, and printed material that include a substantial body of culinary recipes; treatises on and studies of gastronomy; or memoirs, diary accounts, or descriptions of food and cooking.  Projects may cover any period or country.  Funded by the Pine Tree Foundation of New York. Apply through the BSA.

Early Books and Manuscripts

The BSA-Harry Ransom Center Pforzheimer Fellowship in Bibliography (two awards, $3,000 each) supports the bibliographical study of medieval and early modern books and manuscripts held in the Ransom Center’s Pforzheimer Library and its other wide-ranging collections. International and non-US residents are welcome to apply for this fellowship. For more information on this fellowship and to learn more about the Ransom Center, see the Ransom Center’s website. Application is via the BSA’s Kaleidoscope page.

The Eighteenth-Century

The BSA-ASECS Fellowship for Bibliographical Studies in the Eighteenth Century ($3,000).  Recipients must be members of the American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies at the time of the award. Apply through the BSA.

Hispanic World

The BSA-Pine Tree Foundation Fellowship in Hispanic Bibliography ($3,000) supports the bibliographical study of printed and manuscript items or the bibliographical study of book and manuscript collections

1) in the Spanish language in any period or country, or

2) in any language but produced or located in Spain or its overseas dominions during the time of Spanish sovereignty.  Funded by the Pine Tree Foundation of New York. Apply through the BSA.

North America

The BSA-St. Louis Mercantile Library Fellowship ($3,000) supports research in North American bibliography, including studies in the North American book trade, production and distribution of North American books, North American book illustration and design, North American collecting and connoisseurship, and North American bibliographical history in general.  Non-traditional and innovative projects will be especially welcome and encouraged.  Funded by the St. Louis Mercantile Library. Apply through the BSA.

Western Hemisphere

The Reese Fellowship for American Bibliography and the History of the Book in the Americas ($3,000) may be awarded to any scholar, whether academic or independent, whose project explores the history of print culture in the Western Hemisphere.  Funded by the William Reese Company. Apply through the BSA.

Fellowships for Applicants from Specified Groups

Black Bibliographers

The Dorothy Porter Wesley Fellowship ($3,000) supports bibliographical study conducted by an individual who identifies as Black.  Building on the Society’s commitment to expanding representation of scholars of all backgrounds and identities, this short-term fellowship may be used to pursue bibliographical research in any field and of any period.  Projects may include studying the history of book or manuscript production, publication, distribution, collecting, or reading.  Projects to establish a text are also eligible.  The fellowship honors the life and work of Dorothy Porter Wesley (1905-1995), an accomplished Black bibliographer and librarian, an active member of the Society, and author of the influential 1945 PBSA article “Early American Negro Writings.”  Funded by Bruce and Mary Crawford and Barbara A. Shailor in memory of Dorothy Porter Wesley. Apply through the BSA.

Early Career Collections Professionals

The BSA Peck-Stacpoole Fellowship for Early Career Collections Professionals ($3,000) supports bibliographical research by conservators, curators, librarians, and others who are responsible for institutional collections of textual artifacts, at early stages of their careers. Apply through the BSA.

Midwestern Bibliographers

The Caxton Club Fellowship for Midwestern Bibliographers ($2,500 and a one-year membership in both the Caxton Club and the BSA) supports bibliographical research that focuses on the physical aspects of books or manuscripts as historical evidence.  Books and manuscripts in any field and of any period are eligible for consideration.  Projects may include studying the history of book or manuscript production, publication, distribution, collecting, or reading.  Projects to establish a text are also eligible.  Studies of enumerative bibliographies and enumerative bibliographies are also eligible as long as they meet the requirements described above.  Applicants must live in one of the following states: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, or Wisconsin. Apply through the BSA.

Rare Book School Attendees

The BSA-Rare Book School Fellowship funds tuition for one first-year attendee each year at any course offered by Rare Book School at the University of Virginia, in Charlottesville or another location, with an additional grant for travel or housing expenses.  Candidates must apply on the Rare Book School website’s scholarship page. Apply through the BSA.


 

2021 BSA Fellowship Award Winners

Sandro Jung (Shanghai University of Finance and Economics), Katharine F. Pantzer Senior Fellow in the British Book Trades: Eighteenth-Century British Regional Book Illustrations of Literature: Models, Production, and Commercial Use in the North of England

Amanda Arceneaux (Brown University), BSA Short-Term Fellowship: To Know an Herbe: Vernacular Herbal Manuscripts, 1570-1750

Carlos Diego Arenas Pacheco (University of Notre Dame), BSA-Pine Tree Fellowship in Hispanic Bibliography: Indigenous Latinists: 16th-century books from Santa Cruz de Tlatelolco at the Sutro Library, San Francisco

James P. Ascher (University of Virginia), BSA Short-Term Fellowship: Seventeenth-Century Printer’s Copy and Records at the Royal Society

Paulina Banas (Maryland Institute College of Art), BSA Short-Term Fellowship: Visualizing Egypt: European Travel, Book Illustration, and the Marketing of the East in the 19th Century

Ellen Barth (University of Münster (WWU)), BSA-Pine Tree Foundation Fellowship in Culinary Bibliography: Women as Producers of American Community Cookbooks, 1950s to 1990s: Motivations and Materials

Meghan Constantinou (The Grolier Club), the Fredson Bowers Award: The Library Catalogues of the Elliots of Minto: A Scottish Aristocratic Library in Context, 1738-1938

Patricia Andrea Dosio (Universidad Nacional de Tres de Febrero), BSA Short-Term Fellowship: Sketching connections: reconstruction of the rioplatense cultural scene through the editions of Aquilino Fernández (1880-1930)

Anne Garner (Drew University), Charles J. Tanenbaum Fellowship in Cartographical Bibliography: Recovering Feminine Cartographies: Women Wayfinders and ‘Vanishing Monuments’ in the Canadian Territories, 1795-1990

Ostap Kin (Zimmerli Art Museum, Rutgers University), BSA Peck-Stacpoole Fellowship for Early Career Collections Professionals: Poet’s Choice: Bohdan Boychuk’s Lost Anthology of Ukrainian Modernist Poetry

William Little (The Ohio State University), Caxton Club Fellowship for Midwestern Bibliographers: The Latin Poetry of Nallio Rainaldi of Tagliacozzo

Mark Mattes (University of Louisville), BSA-St. Louis Mercantile Library Fellowship: Archival Apocrypha: Indigenous Writing and the Figure of Logan in Colonial and Native American History

Lucy Mookerjee (The Norfolk Historical Society & Museum/Harvard University), BSA Peck-Stacpoole Fellowship for Early Career Collections Professionals: The Itinerary of a Cookbook: Mapping the Cultural Routes of Morgan MS B.36 (An edition and analysis)

Yelda Nasifoglu (University of Oxford), Katharine Pantzer Junior Fellowship in the British Book Trades: Mathematics in Circulation in Late Seventeenth-Century London: Evidence from hammer copies of auction catalogues

Julie Park (New York University), BSA-ASECS Fellowship for Bibliographical Studies in the Eighteenth Century: Writing’s Maker: Inscribing the Self in the Eighteenth Century

Jacinta Saffold (University of New Orleans), Dorothy Porter Wesley Fellowship: Independent Hip Hop Production as Freedom Dreaming

Cecilia Sideri (University of Verona), BSA Short-Term Fellowship: Reconstructing the Library and Reading Habits of the Renaissance Manuscript Collector and Calligraphist Marco Antonio Altieri (1450-1532)

Jessica Terekhov (Princeton University), BSA Short-Term Fellowship: The Life Cycle of the Part-Issued Victorian Novel

Fabián Vega (University of Buenos Aires), The Reese Fellowship for American Bibliography and the History of the Book in the Americas: Books from the Guaraní Missions. Jesuit Libraries and Circulation of Knowledge in the South American Borderlands (18th Century)

Laura Viaut (University of Paris I Panthéon Sorbonne), BSA Short-Term Fellowship: Production and circulation of educational manuscripts of Roman-barbarian law in the early Middle Ages

For a list of previous BSA Research Fellows and their research topics, follow this link.